When Was the Last Time You Went Fishing with Your Kids?

Cousin time in the mountains.

This annual gathering of your parents, aunts and uncles, and the younger generation of cousins has become a tradition, but there were many times this summer when you feared that the 10 year streak of meeting in the mountains of Colorado would come to an end. Fortunately, the reservations that you and your relatives had made nearly 12 months ago were honored and most of the family was able to meet for a week in The Rocky Mountains. With a few restrictions about some of the indoor activities that you have enjoyed in the past, however, your family had to reexamine the typical schedule that you follow. With your children getting older, though, many of the indoor pastimes that provided both convenience and safety are no longer necessary. Even your son, the youngest in the gathering of nearly 30 people can now hike long distances and actually prefers a quiet day on the lake over a noisy arcade. The changes to the schedule, in fact, helped you reexamine all of the different things that the state of Colorado has to offer. By the end of the week, the new experiences with sage fly reels and fly fishing tackle bags were everyone’s favorite.

Your father, the oldest of the group, enjoyed the chance to practice a sport that he had not done since he was a young man before a wife and kids, and the youngest members in the group were more than willing to adorn themselves in the garb that was required. The pictures are fabulous and the memories are even better, but this round of cousin time was definitely a success.

Outdoor Family Time Grows Increasingly Popular

The latest research indicates that as much as 60% of recreational fishing participants were under 45 in the year 2017. This means that years before the pandemic, there was a new generation interested in the quiet time that has long been associated with sage fly reels and tall hip waiters. And today, when research continues to show that the great outdoors is likely the best way to stay healthy, even more people are working with professional guides to get a grasp of how spending an afternoon in a mountain stream may be the very best way to escape the news and the politics of the day.

Another interesting statistic from the year of 2017 is that at that time there were approximately 11.6 million youth participants, aged between six and 17 years, fishing in the U.S. And while few of these youngest fishing enthusiasts likely understood the use of the long reedy rods and sage fly reels, with the guidance and pocket books of their parents and grandparents, many of them might find that they also love the art of fly fishing.

The ultimate commune with nature, if you have ever spent a day on a river perfecting or simply practicing the perfect cast with sage fly reels you know what the benefits are. Being outside, of course, is a plus for a generation of teens and young adults who likely grew up and remain attached to technology, and that is likely one of the top benefits of the sport of fishing. But stepping away from technology, of course, is not the only advantage. Removing yourself from the hectic life of work, school activities, and organized sports that keep families going in every direction but the dinner table has taken a toll on society. As a result, there are more and more families who have found they really desire a time to leave their planners and phones at home and enjoy all of the things that nature has to offer.

Many families are using the restrictions on international travel and the closures of big resorts to redefine what their time together can be like. And while a decision to go fly fishing is certainly not as inexpensive as taking a tackle box to the local lake, practice with a rod and reel to get the rhythm of fly fishing is no less addictive. If you are looking for one more outing this summer before the kids return to school in whatever form that may be, fly fishing in the mountains is a great option!

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